Monday, September 20, 2021

Canada: Public anger swells in Alberta from handling of the pandemic


CBC News shows the Canadian story. Greg Lyle, founder of the Innovative Research Group, breaks down provincial polling of where Albertans stand on Premier Jason Kenney and how the conservatives have handled COVID-19.

Canada election: Nearly half of Canadians don't like any party, poll shows


Global News shows that a new polling by Ipsos exclusive to Global News shows nearly half of Canadians, about 46 per cent of those surveyed, are not a fan of any of the federal parties because none have done enough to win them over. 

The polling also found that of the 53 per cent of voters who are absolutely sure of who they will vote for, Conservative and Bloc supporters are the ones most confident in their decision. NDP and Green supporters are the least confident in voting for their preferred party.

The Liberals are in the middle of the pack with just over 50 per cent of Canadians happy with their choice.

Canada: Protests against pandemic protocols, vaccine passports held at Canadian hospitals


Global News in Canada shows that demonstrators against pandemic protocols and COVID-19 vaccines voiced their displeasure outside hospitals across Canada on Monday.
 
The protests come the same day British Columbia followed several provinces in implementing proof of vaccine requirements for non-essential services, and also announced plans to mandate vaccines among health workers.
 
Eric Sorensen looks at who's opposing the measures meant to protect Canadians, as political leaders of all stripes condemn aggression toward front-line workers.

Canada election: Federal leaders’ last pitch to voters before they head to the polls


Global News in Canada shows that Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau is going hard in the final days of the federal election campaign, with seven stops in southern Ontario on Saturday. As Abigail Bimman reports, Trudeau is returning to ridings where the race to victory will be tight. 

Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole dodged questions about whether candidates in his party are vaccinated against COVID-19. As Mike Le Couteur explains, O'Toole’s lack of answers, and the urgency in the final days of the campaign, could lose him votes.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh is targeting the Conservative premiers of Alberta and Saskatchewan, two of Canada's COVID-19 hotspots, while campaigning in the Prairie provinces. As Robin Gill explains, Singh isn't just attacking those leaders' handling of the pandemic. 

Green Party Leader Annamie Paul has finally taken her campaign to British Columbia, where the party held its two remaining seats when Parliament was dissolved. But Paul's final pitch may not be enough to keep those seats from slipping away from the Greens. Richard Zussman reports from Victoria, B.C.

See more information here:
https://globalnews.ca/news/8201199/commentary-shockers-probabilities-canada-election/

Key "battlegrounds" to watch across Canada


CTV News shows the interesting Canadian story. Evan Solomon and former MPs look at the key battlegrounds to watch and discuss the party's path to victory.

Canada: Advice for voters on the eve of Election Day: A Q&A with Elections Canada spokeperson Diane Benson


CTV News shows the interesting Canadian story.

CTV News Channel’s Lois Lee interviewed Diane Benson, spokesperson at Elections Canada, about tomorrow’s federal election.

Health Canada tracking menstrual changes after vaccination


CityNews says that Health officials say there is no known association between any of the COVID-19 vaccines and menstrual changes. But, as Faiza Amin reports, researcher are now studying the possibility after receiving dozens of reports.

Canada: Calls grow for Jason Kenney to resign over Alberta's COVID-19 crisis


Global News shows that Jason Kenney's time as Alberta premier's may be numbered, as calls multiply for him to resign, even from within his own party. 

Meanwhile, the province’s health care system is bucking under the COVID-19 crisis Kenney’s government is under fire for fuelling, with just over 2,000 new cases in a single day on Friday. 

Tom Vernon reports on the push to get rid of Kenney.

AUKUS: Why Are France and China so Angry About This Pact? - TLDR News


TLDR News shows that on Wednesday night, US President Joe Biden, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced a new security pact: AUKUS. The agreement has since sparked anger in both France for a perceived snubbing of their own deal with Australia, and China, who see this as an "incredibly irresponsible" move.

TLDR is all about getting you up to date with the current news. Get the information you need and make decisions.

Canada: How do the federal parties intend to manage COVID-19?


CBC News shows Candidates for the NDP, Liberal and Conservative parties discuss the federal government's role in ending the pandemic.

Saturday, September 18, 2021

Canada: Alta. doctor says system has collapsed - 'Warzone medicine'


CTV News shows that Dr. Ilan Schwartz says that Alberta's health system has collapsed and is now only able to offer care to the most seriously injured or sick.

Canada: How does today's polling compare to 2019?


CBC News shows how Éric Grenier tells us where the parties stand using CBC's poll tracker.

How Alberta, Saskatchewan became Canada's COVID-19 epicentres


Global News shows that 2 provinces are facing serious consequences from lifting COVID-19 restrictions too early. In Alberta and Saskatchewan, thousands of elective surgeries have been cancelled, as hospitals struggle with surging COVID-19 patients. Heather Yourex-West reports on the crises these provinces are facing.

Canada: How the parties will handle the housing crisis


CBC News shows the Canada story: Affordable housing has been on the minds of many voters this election, and all the main parties have made promises about how they plan to make housing more attainable. So how do their plans stack up?

Leaders try to drum up support in Canadian election's final days


Global News shows that the federal party leaders are running out of time to win over voters. Abigail Bimman reports on the questions that Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau is dodging. Mike Le Couteur looks into Conservative Leader Erin O'Toole’s refusal to say the Alberta premier’s name, and how Jason Kenney and the People’s Party of Canada are posing threats to the Tories’ success.

Canada: Sask. hospitals may need help from other provinces


CBC News shows that Dr. Susan Shaw, the Saskatchewan Heath Authority's chief medical officer, gives an update on the COVID-19 situation in the province.

Canada: Sask. Premier announces mandatory masking, proof of vaccination policy


CTV News shows that in a video posted to Facebook Thursday, Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe announced an indoor mask mandate and a proof of vaccination policy.

USA forms new security alliance without Canada


CityNews Channel on Youtube shows that the USA and U.K. will share sensitive and closely guarded nuclear technology with Australia under a new security alliance that doesn’t include Canada. Caryn Ceolin with whether Ottawa is being shut out by its key intelligence allies.

From Pfizer to Comirnaty: Why are there new names for COVID-19 vaccines in Canada?


Global News shows that Health Canada took to Twitter on Thursday to announce new names for its approved COVID-19 brands: Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine will now be known as "Comirnaty," Moderna's has been dubbed "Spikevax" and AstraZeneca’s will be called "Vaxzevria."

The changes in-name-only come as both the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines have been given the full rubber stamp, receiving full Health Canada approval for anyone aged 12 and older on Thursday.

As experts note, the act of naming drugs and vaccines is a standardized process and can take a lot of time, and due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it can take several months to occur. 

Kat Ward reports.

A pronunciation guide:

Comirnaty (koe-mir’-na-tee)
Spikevax (Spike-vax)
Vaxzevria (vax-ZEV-ria)

Total USA COVID-19 cases move past 42 million


The statistics look like 1 in 500 USA Residents Has Now Died From Coronavirus Covid-19. TODAY Channel on Youtube shows that ahead of a key meeting about COVID-19 booster shots, new data about them is surfacing as the USA reaches another grim milestone: One in 500 residents has now died from the coronavirus. NBC’s Gabe Gutierrez reports for TODAY from the New York City headquarters of Pfizer.

Coronavirus: Total USA COVID-19 cases move past 42 million. Total COVID-19 cases in the United States certainly surpassed 42 million on Saturday, with nearly more than 1 million new cases in less than a week.

By late Saturday morning, USA COVID-19 cases totaled 42,011,096 cases and the nationwide death toll totaled 672,880, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally.

The latest figures mean that the most recent 1 million cases were reported within the past 5 days.

One of the CDC studies says: Unvaccinated people are 11 times more likely to die of COVID-19.

Monday, September 6, 2021

Funniest Animals - Cats and Dogs - Best Of 2021 Funny Animal Videos


Take a look at great funny animals: Funniest Animals - Cats and Dogs - Best Of 2021 Funny Animal Videos.

The so-called word "Humour" (Commonwealth English) or "humor" (American English) is the tendency of experiences to provoke laughter and provide amusement. The term derives from the humoral medicine of the ancient Greeks, which taught that the balance of fluids in the human body, known as humours (Latin: humor, "body fluid"), controlled human health and emotion.

People of all ages and cultures respond to funny humour. Most people are able to experience so-called humour - be amused, smile or laugh at something funny (such as a pun or joke) - and thus are considered to have a sense of humour. The hypothetical person lacking a sense of humour would likely find the behaviour inducing it to be inexplicable, strange, or even irrational. Though ultimately decided by personal taste, the extent to which a person finds something humorous depends on a host of variables, including geographical location, culture, maturity, level of education, intelligence and context. More sophisticated forms of humour exist such as satire. They require an understanding of its social meaning and context.

Funny Animals - Cute Dogs And Cats That Will Make You Laugh


Funny Animals' Life on Youtube shows you the funny animals.

Hi everyone, see the funniest animal videos selection #2. In this series of funny videos you will see funny cats, dogs, other cute pets that will give you a good mood all day long.

Enjoy watching and try not to laugh.  

Thanks for wonderful music by Vexento - "Digital Hug"
https://www.youtube.com/user/Vexento

The so-called "dog" or "domestic dog" (Canis familiaris) is a domesticated descendant of the wolf, characterized by an upturning tail. The dog derived from an ancient, extinct wolf, and the modern grey wolf is the dog's nearest living relative. The dog was the first species to be domesticated, by so-called hunter-gatherers over 15,000 years ago, before the development of agriculture. Their long association with humans has led dogs to be uniquely adapted to human behavior, leading to a large number of domestic individuals and the ability to thrive on a starch-rich diet that would be inadequate for other canids.

The dog has been selectively bred over millennia for various behaviors, sensory capabilities, and physical attributes. Dog breeds vary widely in shape, size, and color. They perform many roles for humans, such as hunting, herding, pulling loads, protection, assisting police and the military, companionship, therapy, and aiding disabled people. This influence on human society has given them the sobriquet of so-called "man's best friend."

Synonyms of "sobriquet":

alias
byname
cognomen
epithet
handle
moniker
monicker
nickname


The so-called "cat" animal (Felis catus) is a domestic species of small carnivorous mammal. It is the only domesticated species in the family Felidae and is often referred to as the so-called domestic cat to distinguish it from the wild members of the family. A cat can either be a house cat, a farm cat or a feral cat; the latter ranges freely and avoids human contact. Domestic cats are valued by humans for companionship and their ability to hunt rodents. About 60 cat breeds are recognized by various cat registries.

The cat is similar in anatomy to the other felid species: it has a strong flexible body, quick reflexes, sharp teeth and retractable claws adapted to killing small prey. Its night vision and sense of smell are well developed. Cat communication includes vocalizations like loud or quiet meowing, purring, trilling, hissing, growling and grunting as well as cat-specific body language. A predator that is most active at dawn and dusk (crepuscular), the cat is a solitary hunter but a so-called social species. It can hear sounds too faint or too high in frequency for human ears, such as those made by mice and other small mammals. It secretes and perceives certain pheromones.

So You Got Science Of Funny Animals


Science Loop on Youtube has another interesting video: So You Got Science Of Funny Animals, ... Now What? [part 2]

See the Internet's most funny videos and their Scientific explanations. This is the Part 2 of this Series about how dolphins mimic using echolocation, why these animals follow points, the massive power of elephant trunks, and many more interesting animal science facts.

Don't Forget to watch Part 1: https://youtu.be/3xoih0cSrnE

1. Dog slipping on a surface
2. Dolphin
3. Point follow 
4. Massive power of elephant trunk

So-called "Cherophobia" is THE FEAR OF BEING HAPPY. Cherophobia is certainly a phobia where a person has an irrational aversion to being happy. The term comes from the Greek word "chero," which means "to rejoice." When a person experiences cherophobia, they're often afraid to participate in activities that many would characterize as fun, or of being happy.

See how dolphins mimic using echolocation, why these animals follow points, the massive power of elephant trunks, and much more.

"Echolocation" is an interesting effect. Nature's so-called own sonar system, echolocation occurs when an animal emits a sound wave that bounces off an object, returning an echo that provides information about the object's distance and size. Over a thousand species echolocate, including most bats, all toothed whales, and small mammals.

Dolphin communication is interesting. It seems that Dolphins Speak Body Language. Beyond echolocation, clicking and whistling, dolphins communicate with a variety of body language signals including tail and flipper slapping on water, leaping out of water, bumping each other and spy hopping.

Dolphin communication is certainly called "echolocation." Clicks are used to sense their surroundings through echolocation, while they use whistles to communicate with other members of their species and very likely, with certain other species too. It is also thought that each dolphin has a unique whistle called a 'signature whistle', which is used to identify an individual.

Dolphins certainly communicate using a vast array of sounds and nonverbal gestures. Like humans, dolphins use both verbal utterances and nonverbal gestures to communicate with one another. These include whistles, clicks, and loud broadband packets of sound called burst pulses.

It seems that smart dolphins demonstrate the ability to do intellegent things and most scientists agree that dolphins are very intelligent. They are notoriously talented mimics and quick learners; they demonstrate self-awareness, problem-solving, and empathy, innovation, teaching skills, grief, joy and playfulness.

Dolphins can bite. Dolphins certainly have sharp teeth that they usually use to rip apart their prey. Bottlenose dolphins, for example, have between 80 and 100 teeth that they use to grab, grip and secure their prey. The underwater creatures can also bite humans on occasion.

If a certain dolphin approaches you in the water, do not engage, follow, or otherwise interact with the animal. Allow it to pass by undisturbed and maintain its so-called natural animal behaviors.

Dolphins at swim-with attractions have been known to seriously attack and hurt humans by butting them and the resulting injuries have included lacerations and broken bones.

It seems that some friendly dolphins can save people from drowning.

Never touch or pet dolphins, even if they come close enough to touch. Use binoculars to watch dolphins from a safe distance in their so-called natural habitat, instead.

It seems that some dolphins "get high." A documentary shows dolphins in trance-like state after snacking on puffer fish. A new documentary on the BBC shows dolphins using pufferfish to get to a trance-like state.

Sunday, September 5, 2021

Construction: Toronto: Yonge and Spring Garden - August 2021


There is some interesting construction going on at Yonge St & Spring Garden Ave in Toronto, ON, Canada. Interesting site plans and explanations of the construction can be found here: https://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2015/ny/bgrd/backgroundfile-73775.pdf

Toronto is a densely populated city with many condos and cranes. All non-essential construction projects will be halted to help slow the spread of Coronavirus COVID-19. The list of exceptions under this category, however, is long and complicated. Allowed projects are "infrastructure projects such as new hospitals, roads and bridges" and "residential construction that is near completion." The rules also allow many of the condo projects and residential home renovations that have already started.

On April 16, 2021, in response to alarming new COVID-19 case growth and a third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Ontario government announced a return to shut down of certain non-essential construction projects, with effect at 12:01 a.m. on Saturday, April 17, 2021. There is now the possibility of a 4th virus wave.





Friday, September 3, 2021

Canada: Ontario's COVID-19 vaccine passport plan unveiled, won't apply to retail


CityNews shows that after weeks of speculation, the Ford government announced their plan for vaccine certificates on Wednesday. Adrian Ghobrial explains when, where and how they'll work.

Canada election: Sparks fly in 1st French-language leaders debate


Global News in Canada shows that four of Canada’s party leaders squared off Thursday night for their first televised debate in the federal election campaign, with the COVID-19 pandemic and vaccinations taking centre stage.

The French-language debate featured Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and Bloc Québécois Leader Yves-François Blanchet, who were on stage at the TVA network in Montreal.

It involved a series of face-to-face encounters between two people at a time, which led to longer and fiery exchanges. The event came midway through the campaign, as leaders hope to snap up votes before the election Sept. 20.

Global's Mike Le Couteur has details.

COVID-19: What vaccine passports in Quebec, Ontario mean for Canada's largest provinces?


Global News in Canada shows that recently Quebec became the first province to put its vaccine passport system into practice.

The passports are essentially certificates that confirm vaccinations and allow people to do things like eat out at restaurants, work out at gyms or attend live concerts. Mike Armstrong has a look at the rollout and the resistance.

In Ontario, residents will soon have to show proof they’ve been fully vaccinated as the province rolled out the details for its COVID-19 passport.

But as Jamie Maraucher reports, the patchwork of COVID-19 passports across the country comes with concerns.

COVID-19 rallies across Canada


CityNews shows that in a 24-hour period, protests over COVID-19 health restrictions erupted in Manitoba, BC, and Ontario. Several protests took place in front of hospitals, distressing medical staff, and patients. Mark Neufeld reports.

Canada: Ontario could see 9,000 daily COVID-19 cases by October


CTV News shows how infectious disease expert Dr. Isaac Bogoch breaks down new modelling showing the fourth wave could have a serious impact on Ontario's ICUs.